Sunday, May 1, 2011

Sunday stills: Rust

I apologize I haven't been around for many Sunday stills since I went to school. There was just not the appropriate internet connection available to be uploading pictures.

I'll try to get the challenge done every week from now on so long as I have an internet connection (which I should).

Rust and rusty things. Let me tell you about some rust and hammers.

First hammers need to be well balanced if you are using them all the time. Balanced for the length of your arm and the proper weight for the job. If the hammers handle is too long and your arm is too short it is going to stress your elbow. If the handle is too short and your arm is too long it's going to stress your wrist. Just saying, first hand experience here. Literally, I hit my hands A LOT. I also do not recommend hitting appendages of your body with hammers because the outcome is almost always black and blue.

These hammers however are part of my family history. They sit here on my fathers workbench in the garage just waiting to be used once again.

After spending oh about...$500 on hammers at school I come home to find my dad had my grandfathers old forging hammers and never even told me!! Almost as if they were made for me in weight and handle length these hammers from the past are now mine to forge with just as my grandfather did in his shop. A bit rusty from years of sitting in a tool box they are better to me than my mass produced expensive hammers. They may be rusty but quite useful for many years to come. Too bad they didn't keep the old anvil too, I would have loved that.

18 comments:

chloephotography said...

nice composition

Ed said...

Very cool shot, glad to have ya back. What school needs $500 in hammers? Ferrier school? :-))

threecollie said...

What a cool story about the hammers and such a shame about the anvil. Very nice mood in the photo!

dibear said...

Well done. I know you will cherish your grandfather's hammers. :)

Dreaming said...

Oh gosh, you reminded me that we have some old forging equipment I could have used for this challenge!
Love your hammers and how cool that they 'fit'. I was interested in your description of stress on elbow or wrist. My husband did some decorative blacksmithing and totally wrecked his elbow... hmmmm!
Glad to have you back from your wonderful learning adventure!

Shirley said...

Family heirlooms and carrying on the tradition- your grandfather would be proud of you.

achieve1dream said...

I love the picture. :) So how do you determine the correct length? Trial and error? I know usually for me it's the wrist that is stressed. Very interesting information. Thanks for sharing.

Regular Guy said...

Nice job, I really like your picture.

Dom said...

A great photo that tells a story :)

MTWaggin said...

Well done and I can feel the history in that photo. Often the most useful tools are the tried and true!

robinsnest3 said...

Nice shots! Great composition (and glad you're back). I've got someone else here who's happy to have you back too.:)

Patches said...

Love that pic! Very cool! Don't ya love how it's only AFTER you buy new stuff that the old stuff comes out?! *sigh* That is so great that you'll be able to use those same hammers that your grandfather used!

Rising Rainbow said...

So cool that you have family heirlooms like this and they just happened to fit you first Sunday Stills challenge since you got back.

I'm all caught up on your posts and must say I just had to laugh, just a little, about you wanting those warm temps again. After all, remember those soft winter Canada feet next to those OK granite ones. Trade offs, for sure. LOL

Glad you're back safely and life is going your way. That's pretty darn cool. AND driving for the handicapped, pretty darn cool too.

Michelle said...

Welcome back! Great job.

Brenda said...

I just love and adore that you are using your grandfather's farrier tools. I think we all need to use something of the past, and keep it working!

Jen said...

What a lovely legacy to have :o)

Laughing Orca Ranch said...

Too bad you're not closer. We have an antique anvil that belonged to my husband's family during the Civil War. They brought it over from Germany. We keep it in our barn.
It would be neat to see it being used by someone again, though.

~Lisa

Grey Horse Matters said...

Great picture but even greater find for you. How wonderful to be able to use those hammers now, it is too bad the anvil wasn't saved.

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